Category Archives: Living History

Illumination and Remembrance Ceremony

The AMERICAN CIVIL WAR MEMORIAL 

Remembers the fifty-eight men of Waterloo who died in the Civil War (1861-1865) and recognizes all the soldiers and sailors who gave their lives in the conflict.

Ceremony at the American Civil War Memorial will be held on Friday, May 27, 2022 at 7:30pm. Located on the corner of Locust Street & South Virginia Street. https://www.americancivilwarmemorial.com

Schedules – Applications – Maps available

If you are looking for a Schedule of Events, Event Map or 5k Race Map, or need an  Application for an event or wish to be a vendor, please visit this link.

Schedules, Applications, Maps, etc.

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The Cornell Cooperative Extension Culinary Tent

“The Culinary tent is a great resource to learn about foods grown and produced locally in Seneca County and the surrounding Finger Lakes area,” said CCE Executive Director Ave Bauder. “The public is invited to taste delicious samples, while getting new recipes and nutrition tips.

Saturday will feature a variety of presenters offering tasty samples.
Sunday will offer a Jr. Iron Chef Competition.  Check it out.

The Cornell Cooperative Extension Culinary tent will have lots of great information about food and nutrition throughout the weekend, plus gardening, agriculture, recycling, and youth programming from CCE.  Stop in for some tips and recipes.

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For a complete list of events at our Culinary Tent, go to our website at: www.senecacountycce.org

Fritz Klein as President Abraham Lincoln May 24th-26th

Klein’s portrayal of Lincoln brings this American icon to life. He bears a striking physical resemblance to Lincoln. His programs are thoroughly researched, historically accurate, and blend Lincoln’s humor with his great humanity. His ability to adapt to any audience and adapt his program’s content to your theme means that you are guaranteed to walk away with new insight into the man and a genuine sense that you have been with Lincoln himself.

To prepare for a performance, it takes about an hour with costume and make-up. However, if you happen to have Lincoln in mind, his natural resemblance to Abraham Lincoln can be quite convincing. Several years ago when visiting Washington D.C. he created something of a stir when he walked into Ford’s Theater, the place where Lincoln was shot. Though Klein was dressed in ordinary street attire, with his 6’3″ height and Quaker beard one woman screamed outright when she looked up to see him casually strolling down the stairs.

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Actor Fritz Klein of Springfield, Illinois has been a professional actor and speaker for many years. His portrayal of Lincoln brings this American icon to life. Klein brings striking physical resemblance as well as historical accuracy, acting ability, humor, and relevance to the audience. Productions vary in content and length according to the need and character of the audience, but you will come away with new insight and the sense that you have been with Lincoln himself. Klein was first asked to portray Lincoln after performing as Lyman Beecher in a local history pageant in Kailua-Kona, Hawai’i where he lived at the time. After a number of requests for repeat performances, he decided to begin extensive research in order to write a one-man production on Lincoln. That production has led to many others. He has since performed as Lincoln in 38 states and internationally as well. He and his wife Linda now reside in Springfield, Illinois where he performs at the new Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum, as well as many other venues around the country. In the summer Klein plays Lincoln in a variety of venues in a program called “History Comes Alive. In 2011 Klein was featured in the National Park Service’s recreation of Lincoln’s Inaugural Journey, travelling from Springfield to Washington, DC. and performing for some 5,000 people enroute. Klein portrayed Lincoln in a feature entitled “Lost River” and four History Channel Lincoln Bicentennial spots, as well as the award-winning Lincoln film at the Lincoln Home National Park “Journey to Greatness” by Aperture films of Los Angeles. On President Obama’s Inauguration night, Klein was Lincoln in the first American showing of a German film called “Lincoln’s Last Night” produced by VIDICOM of Hamburg and again featured at the Smithsonian for the 2013 Inauguration. Klein was also featured in the 2013 Ford’s Theater exhibit put together by History Channel. Klein has also done numerous documentary and feature films for National Geographic, Discovery and History Channel including “Stealing Lincoln’s Body”, “Lincoln’s Secret Killer”, and “American Mastermind”. In 2013 the Smithsonian film, “Lincoln’sWashingtonWar” aired in 2013, on the Smithsonian Channel, and he appeared on National television with “Larry the Cable Guy”. In April 2015 a new documentary “Lincoln’s Last Day” aired on the Smithsonian Channel. Recent plays include a 2012 role in the Pulitzer – Prize nominated production “The Heavens Are Hung in Black” by James Still, and a 2014 appearance with actor Carlo Garcia in “Of Mutual Interest – Lincoln and Mexico” before Illinois Governor and delegates from Mexico. In the Fall of 2014 a new Ken Bradbury play about Lincoln’s assassination called “Last Full Measure” opened at Union Theater in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum. That play will continue to run in locations around the country through 2016.

President Abraham Lincoln (Fritz Klein) speaks at the American Civil War memorial in Waterloo, New York. As keynote speaker at the annual Illumination Ceremony, He was asked to make some comments about the battles at Gettysburg and his part in the dedication of the cemetery. His comments conclude with his famous Gettysburg Address, recited as only the President could.
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The 148th New York Volunteer Regiment of Infantry

In the reenactment community, the 148th New York Volunteers are considered veterans. Established in 1962, the 148th is the oldest Civil War reenactment organization in New York State. Since its founding, it has participated in several hundred Civil War battle reenactments and hosted scores of living history events, marched in parades and given presentations for schools and historical societies. Even though the organization is built on a military impression, families participate in the recreation of a time in American history when everyone was touched by the events, not just the soldiers serving in Dixie. The original 148th was recruited from the Finger Lakes regions of New York. They were assigned to the Army of the James and served under Major General Benjamin “The Beast” Butler. Some of the battles they participated in were Drewry’s Bluff, Cold Harbor, the Siege of Petersburg, Chaffin’s Farm, Fair Oaks, the Appomattox Campaign, and the post-war occupation of the city of Richmond. They had five Medal of Honor recipients, and suffered more than 500 casualties. The 148th of today recruits its members primarily from the Finger Lakes area. In 1962, the 148th began with six members from the Ovid Camp of the Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War. Membership in the SUV is a tribute to those “Sons of the Finger Lakes” who answered Lincoln’s call for 300,000 more!

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Reynolds Battery L.

LH_tentReynolds Battery L. 1st NY Light Artillery was formed in 1982 to honor the original battery and educate the public about the Civil War. Members of Reynolds’ Battery are all volunteer and come from as far away as Buffalo and Ithaca. The original Battery L, 1st New York Light Artillery, was raised by John A. Reynolds of Rochester, NY, in September 1861. Recruits were drawn mostly from Rochester, but ranged from all over Western & Northern New York, and Canada. On October 18, 1861, the Battery was officially mustered into the United States Army in Elmira, N Y. They were armed with the first six Model 1861 3″ Ordnance Rifles in the country. From Elmira, the Battery was sent to West Virginia. Their first engagement occurred when a section under Lieutenant Loder came into action in Charleston, WV. On 28 August 1862, the Battery was transferred to the I Corps, Army of the Potomac, and it participated in all the engagements of that Corps until 1864, including Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredricksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. In March 1864, the Army of the Potomac reorganized and the I Corps merged into the V, which Reynolds’ Battery served with through the end of the war, including the battles of Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. Of the approximately 115 men who had originally joined the Battery, 25 still remained with the unit at the time it was mustered out of service on June 17, 1865. A total of 320 men entered service as members of Reynolds’ Battery L. Of these, nine were killed or died from wounds received in action while 14 died from sickness contracted in service. In 1982, Frank Cutler gathered some like-minded reenactors and founded the 1st New York Light Artillery, Reynolds’ Battery L. At first, the Battery had a 3/4 scale cannon, which was sold to raise money for another cannon and this pattern of making and selling was begun. Slowly, over the years, Reynolds’ Battery began to reach its goal of fielding four 3″ Ordnance Rifles with limbers The group received its first 3″ Rifle in 1987, the second was fielded in 1996 and the third in 1997. Although the group members take their hobby very seriously, they have a lot of fun while educating the public and, most importantly, honoring those of the Civil War.